How to Stay Motivated through the Tough Times

Sometimes, you’re on a roll with your diet and exercise/weight loss, but other times… not so much. How do you stay motivated at times like that? How do you stay committed? How do you maintain a sense of control when you don’t see the weight loss you were hoping for on the scale? 

There is a way, and it’s called weight-loss momentum.

Weight-Loss Momentum 
Ultimately, most people who lose a lot of weight on a diet have done so because of weight-loss momentum. It goes deeper than just being motivated in the moment. It’s about being more committed – in the moment and for the long term. 

And that deeper, longer-term commitment – the momentum – occurs when two things happen:

The first is obvious: you lose weight and you feel great – you’re reinforced for the work you’ve been doing. As a result, you become more committed to keeping it going. You’ve just begun to create weight-loss momentum. 

The second is less obvious and relates to you feeling more in control of your lifestyle. You experience this when you finally get in action with the lifestyle changes you’ve been wanting to make. There’s a huge difference between being “in your head” about your weight and being “in action.” 

When you’re “in action,” the very fact that you’re following through on something you said you were going to do strengthens your commitment to keep it going. This happens on top of the satisfaction that you’re losing weight: Action + Satisfaction = Weight-Loss Momentum. 

With true weight-loss momentum, you’re able to withstand those times when you’re not happy with your weight loss, because your sense of control isn’t just about your weight. It’s also about the commitment you’re making (and acting upon) to live a healthier lifestyle. And that helps to keep it all going for another week – even when the scale hasn’t responded as you wanted.

How do you get into action? Contact Atlanta Endocrine for more information about our intensive lifestyle-change program and how to gain momentum with a new diet plan. We can help with medically supervised fast weight loss which is safe and effective for long-term weight management.

Health Management Resources (HMR) has been recognized for four consecutive years as the No. 1 Best Fast Weight-Loss Program by U.S. News and World Report. The HMR program is an intensive weight-loss and lifestyle change program designed to help you lose weight fast and build healthier routines that last.

The Decision-Free Diet is a medically supervised scientifically-based weight-loss program proven to work. You're guided through a simple Decision-Free diet structure that helps you quickly lose weight in a healthy, sensible way. If you’re struggling with weight loss, you need the help of an obesity medicine specialist.

If you’d like to learn more about permanent weight loss, please feel free to call us or schedule an appointment with Dr. Isaacs using the online booking tool on this website.

Author
Scott Isaacs, MD Endocrinologist and Weight Loss Specialist

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