Yo-Yo Dieting Linked to Increased Risk for Early Death

Yo-Yo Dieting Linked to Increased Risk for Early Death

A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism has found that yo-yo dieting, or weight cycling, is associated with an increased risk of premature death. The study found that as weight fluctuation increased, the overall risk of death was also increased.  You can read the study here.

We don’t know why yo-yo dieting increases the risk for early death, but researchers speculate that this type of dieting may be damaging the heart increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Weight loss in general is good for your health but cycling in a pattern of weight loss and regain is not healthy.

Successful weight loss is permanent weight loss. It can be so frustrating when you work hard to lose weight only to see it creep back on over time. Long term weight loss can be difficult, requiring the help of a specialist. Studies have been done looking at the best strategies for long term weight maintenance after weight loss. Effective strategies include low calorie, high protein diets, consistent exercise, self-monitoring and weight loss medications.

If you have lost weight and are struggling to keep it off, you may need the help of a weight loss specialist. Hormonal changes that occur because of weight loss slow metabolism and increase appetite to drive the weight up. In order to lose weight and keep it off permanently, your hormones must be addressed.

Rest assured, we’re here to help and provide you with the tools necessary for appreciable and healthy weight loss.

If you’d like to learn more about permanent weight loss, please feel free to call us or schedule an appointment with Dr. Isaacs using the online booking tool on this website.

Author
Scott Isaacs, MD Endocrinologist and Weight Loss Specialist

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